Hyophorbe lagenicaulis

Posted on February 01, 2009 by anns tropics

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis - Bottle Palm, is a tropical palm suitable for a smaller landscape, or as a large interior potted plant. Hyophorbe lagenicaulis - Bottle Palm - is an endagered species on its only known native home of Round Island in the Mascarene Island Group, Indian Ocean. Hyophorbe lagenicaulis has been saved from extinction by its popularity, and extensive cultivation throughout the world. The Bottle Palm's grossly enlarged base, its neat - tapering crownshaft and canopy, and its slow growth, have made it a most desirable palm for both landscape and interior displays. A dainty, neat palm, growing only to 12 feet, with a bottle-shape trunk which is widest at the base, tapering upwards to the neck of the bottle formed by the crownshaft. The canopy is sparse with only 4 to 8 leaves which are stiff, smooth and recurve on a small, 8 to 10 inch petiole.

The amazing swollen trunk is the eye catcher on this palm, but it also has other interesting characteristics that come and go as the palm matures from a seedling to a mature specimen. As a seedling, and through the Bottle Palm's juvenile period, the crownshaft and leaf petioles are an interesting red to orange color, eventually changing to the normal greyish green color as it matures.

As the Hyophorbe lagenicaulis - Bottle Palm passes from seedling to juvenile it starts to develop the huge, swollen trunk. In the early years, the trunk will swell more the the palm grows in height, making it look like a large ball with a neat little canopy.

As the palm ages, it starts to elongate more than the trunks swells, giving it the bottle shape. During this whole period, the canopy gets larger with each successive growth until the leaves are 9 to 12 feet in leangth. Because this is a slow grower, it can take years for it to reach its mature height.

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis - Bottle Palm is truly a tropical palm. It loves tropical heat and is very salt tolerant. It cannot take any freezing temperatures, and will be severely damaged, if not outright killed by a hard frost. Any temps below 38 degrees call for protection for this palm.

It is commonly thought that the swollen trunk is for the purpose of water storage. This palm however requires frequent watering during extended dry periods to look its best. Hyophorbe lagenicaulis - Bottle Palm also benifits greatly from giving it an application of a good slow release palm fertilizer that includes micronutrients 2 to 3 times a year.

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis - Bottle Palm is a very attractive palm for a small landscape, or a mass planting in a larger landscape area. Also, because it has a very slow growth habit, and a small size, it makes a very nice indoor potted palm for a well lit interior area.

Latest Bottle Palm Article

Posted on February 25, 2007 by Sheepback.Cabin

Filed under Uncategorized | 28 Comments

A bottle palm is a palm tree with a very unusually-shaped trunk. As the name implies, bottle palms have a swollen trunk which does indeed look rather like a bottle, topped with a cluster of about eight fronds. At a distance, a bottle palm looks like a poorly-devised arrangement of greens rammed into a bottle of chianti, making the sight rather unforgettable.

These trees are native to Round Island, a small island located within the nation of Mauritius. Round Island also hosts a number of other unique plants and animals, many of which are unfortunately endangered. In its native environment, the bottle palm is almost extinct, but the trees are widely used in decorative gardening all over the world, so the species is likely to remain hardy for generations to come. Some conservationists have suggested that bottle palms could be replanted on Round Island at some point in the future.

This palm is known formally as Hyophorbe lagenicaulis, and to French speakers as palmiste gargoulette. Bottle palms grow extremely slowly, and they are very sensitive to fluctuations in temperature. Frost will kill bottle palms, and the trees prefer to live in environments where the temperature is always well above freezing. Contrary to popular belief, the swollen trunk does not actually contain water: it's just the way the tree grows.

People who want to use bottle palms in ornamental gardens should live between USDA zones 10 and 11. Bottle palms need full sun to part shade, preferring an environment which is isolated from the wind. They are capable of coping with very poor soil conditions and salt spray, thanks to the harsh environment of Round Island, but caring for a bottle palm with good soil and a fertilizer will encourage the tree to stay healthy and grow more quickly.

Some people use bottle palms in container gardening, where they do quite well. Thanks to the slow rate of growth, it takes a long time for a tree to outgrow a container, and the use of containers allows people to move the trees as needed. In cooler climates, for example, a bottle palm can be kept indoors during inclement weather, and moved outdoors for the warm summer months. Bottle palms also do well in indoor tropic gardens, as long as they get lots of sun. Enjoy :)

How to Grow a Bottle Palm Tree

Posted on February 25, 2008 by eHow

28 Comments

If you are a "green thumb," then you probably are not reading this right now. If you are known as a "black thumb" like me, then read on. I have killed it all, including cacti. I had moved to Florida from NY recently and I was in awe of all the beautiful fauna. My friend gave me a bottle palm tree as a housewarming gift, and my husband was taking bets on when it would be dead. That gave me all the motivation I needed to keep it alive. It was the perfect time to learn how to garden. They say that bottle palms are slow growing, but mine is growing tall and lush extremely fast.

Bottle Palm Careing

Read The Steps Below:

  1. Find a spot that is in full sun.
  2. Dig a hole deep enough to plant the bottle palm. Do not submerge any part of the trunk in the ground. Make sure the area where the roots meet the trunk are slightly above the soil line.
  3. Throw a handful of peat moss in the hole and wet with root stimulator. Use the directions to measure depending on the size of the tree that you are starting with.
  4. Place the roots into the hole and pack with top soil.
  5. Add palm food, water regularly and hope for the best.

Bottle Palm Tree Stats

Posted on February 20, 2008 by BottlePalmTrees.com

18 Comments

  • Category:Tropicals and Tender Perennials Palms
  • Family:Arecaceae (ar-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
  • Genus:Hyophorbe (hy-oh-FOR-bee) (Info)
  • Species:lagenicaulis (lag-en-ee-kAW-liss)
  • Synonym:Hyophorbe revaughnii, Mascarena lagenicaulis Hyophorbe lagenicaulis
  • Locality:Mascarene Islands (E. Africa & of Madagascar Island)
  • Height: 24-36 in. (60-90 cm)
    36-48 in. (90-120 cm)
    4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)
    6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)
    8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)
    10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)
  • Spacing:4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)
  • Hardiness:USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)
    USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)
  • Sun Exposure:Full Sun
    Sun to Partial Shade
    Light Shade
    Partial to Full Shade
    Full Shade
  • Trunk type:Single trunk, bulges at the base, peculiar appearing
  • Leaf type:Pinnate (feather shaped), arched leaves.
  • Foliage:Grown for foliage; Evergreen
  • Suckering/Solitary:Solitaire, sometimes dwarf appearing.
  • Maintenance:With the right conditions, fairly easy. Difficult with cold weather.
  • General Description:A very unusual palm because of the bulge of the trunk. Can survive in the warmest coastal areas. If you get definite freezes, this palm is not for you.
  • Other details:Unknown - Tell us
  • Soil pH requirements:Unknown - Tell us
  • Patent Information:Unknown - Tell us
  • Propagation Methods:From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall
    From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse
    From seed; stratify if sowing indoors
    From seed; sow indoors before last frost
    From seed; direct sow after last frost
    From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel
    From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis

Article by (L.H.Bailey) H.E.Moore (1976)

The name of the genus comes from the combination of the Greek wordings "hys,hyos" = pig and "phorbe" = food, with obvious signification; the name of the species, from the combination of the Latin "lagoena" = bottle, flask, and "caulis" = trunk, with reference to the shape of the trunk.

It is an endemic plant of an islet, the Ile Ronde (Mauritius), where it is at very high risk of extinction, as there are no more than 10 adult specimen alive; the spontaneous reproduction has recently increased thanks to the institution of a natural reserve.

It is known locally (Mauritius), as "palmier bonbonne", elsewhere as "palma bottiglia" (Italian); "bottle palm", "pig nut palm" (English); "palmier bouteille" (French); "Flaschenpalme" (German); "palmera botella", "palma botella", "mascarena" (Spanish); "palmeira-garrafa" (Portuguese).

It shows a solitary greyish trunk, on which are visible the rings left by the fallen-off leaves, with the typical shape of a bottle, tall up to 4 metres, with a diameter of 50-70 cm in the median part, much narrower, 10-30 cm of diameter, at the apex. The leaves,no more than 8, pinnate, are arched, about 2-3 metres long, on a short petiole (10-15 cm of length). The leaflets are of a glossy dark green colour and are inserted on the rachis, to form a V, turned upwards.

The inflorescence, about 80 cm long and very ramified, develops under the leaves and carries cream coloured flowers of both sexes. The fruits are oblong, 2-3 cm long, of orange colour, turning to the black when ripe. It reproduces by seed, which takes 4-6 months to germinate.

Slow-growth plant, is suitable only for tropical climates where it prefers sunny locations; when cultivated in pot, it has a limited utilization for indoor decoration.

Synonyms: Mascarena lagenicaulis L.H.Bailey (1942); Mascarena revaughanii L.H.Bailey (1942).

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis

Article by (L.H.Bailey) H.E.Moore (1976) In italian.

Il nome generico deriva dalla combinazione dei termini greci ‘hys, hyos’ = maiale e ‘phorbe’ = cibo, con ovvio significato; il nome specifico dalla combinazione dei termini latini ‘lagoena’ = bottiglia, fiasco e ‘caulis’ = fusto, con riferimento alla forma del tronco.

E’ una specie endemica di una isoletta, l’Ile Ronde (Mauritius), dove è ad altissimo rischio di estinzione, essendo rimasti non più di 10 esemplari adulti; la riproduzione spontanea è recentemente aumentata grazie alla istituzione di una riserva naturale.

E’ nota localmente (Mauritius) come “palmier bonbonne”, altrove come: “palma bottiglia” (italiano); “bottle palm”, “pig nut palm” (inglese); “palmier bouteille” (francese); “Flaschenpalme” (tedesco); “palmera botella”, “palma botella”, “mascarena” (spagnolo); “palmeira-garrafa” (portoghese).

Presenta un tronco solitario grigiastro, su cui sono visibili gli anelli lasciati dalle foglie cadute, dalla caratteristica forma a bottiglia, alto fino a 4 m, con diametro di 50 - 70 cm nella parte mediana, molto più stretto, 10 - 30 cm di diametro, all’apice. Le foglie pennate sono arcuate, di circa 2-3 m di lunghezza, su corto picciolo (10 - 15 cm di lunghezza) in numero di non più di 8. Le pinnule di colore verde scuro lucido sono inserite sul rachide a formare una V rivolta verso l’alto.

L’infiorescenza, lunga 80 cm circa e molto ramificata, si sviluppa sotto le foglie e porta fiori di entrambi i sessi di color crema. I frutti sono oblunghi, 2 - 3 cm di lunghezza, di colore arancio tendente al nero a maturità. Si riproduce per seme che impiega 4-6 mesi per germinare.

Pianta di lenta crescita, è adatta solo a climi tropicali dove predilige esposizioni soleggiate; coltivata in vaso, ha un limitato utilizzo per la decorazione di interni.

Sinonimi: Mascarena lagenicaulis L.H.Bailey (1942); Mascarena revaughanii L.H.Bailey (1942).

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis

Article by (L.H.Bailey) H.E.Moore (1976) In Español.

Il nome generico deriva dalla combinazione dei termini greci ‘hys, hyos’ = maiale e ‘phorbe’ = cibo, con ovvio significato; il nome specifico dalla combinazione dei termini latini ‘lagoena’ = bottiglia, fiasco e ‘caulis’ = fusto, con riferimento alla forma del tronco.

E’ una specie endemica di una isoletta, l’Ile Ronde (Mauritius), dove è ad altissimo rischio di estinzione, essendo rimasti non più di 10 esemplari adulti; la riproduzione spontanea è recentemente aumentata grazie alla istituzione di una riserva naturale.

E’ nota localmente (Mauritius) come “palmier bonbonne”, altrove come: “palma bottiglia” (italiano); “bottle palm”, “pig nut palm” (inglese); “palmier bouteille” (francese); “Flaschenpalme” (tedesco); “palmera botella”, “palma botella”, “mascarena” (spagnolo); “palmeira-garrafa” (portoghese).

Presenta un tronco solitario grigiastro, su cui sono visibili gli anelli lasciati dalle foglie cadute, dalla caratteristica forma a bottiglia, alto fino a 4 m, con diametro di 50 - 70 cm nella parte mediana, molto più stretto, 10 - 30 cm di diametro, all’apice. Le foglie pennate sono arcuate, di circa 2-3 m di lunghezza, su corto picciolo (10 - 15 cm di lunghezza) in numero di non più di 8. Le pinnule di colore verde scuro lucido sono inserite sul rachide a formare una V rivolta verso l’alto.

L’infiorescenza, lunga 80 cm circa e molto ramificata, si sviluppa sotto le foglie e porta fiori di entrambi i sessi di color crema. I frutti sono oblunghi, 2 - 3 cm di lunghezza, di colore arancio tendente al nero a maturità. Si riproduce per seme che impiega 4-6 mesi per germinare.

Pianta di lenta crescita, è adatta solo a climi tropicali dove predilige esposizioni soleggiate; coltivata in vaso, ha un limitato utilizzo per la decorazione di interni.

Bottle Palms

Article by WikiPedia.

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis, known commonly as the Bottle Palm or Palmiste Gargoulette, is a species of flowering plant in the Arecaceae family. It is found only in Round Island, Mauritius. Bottle Palm has a large swollen (sometimes bizarrely so) trunk. It is a myth that the trunk is a means by which the palm stores water. Bottle Palm has only four to six leaves open at any time. The flowers of the palm arise from under the crownshaft.

Bottle palms are very cold sensitive and are killed at 32°F (0°C) or colder for any appreciable length of time. They may survive a brief, light frost, but will have foliage damage. Only southern Florida provides a safe location in the USA to grow Bottle Palm, although mature flowering specimens may be occasionally be seen in favored microclimates around Cape Canaveral and Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater in coastal central Florida. It makes a fine container-grown palm in other locations as long as it is protected from the cold and not overwatered. While habitat destruction may destroy the last remaining palms in the wild, the survival of the species is assured due to its ubiquitous planting throughout the tropics as a specimen plant.